Issue 40

September 2006
This issue is all about movement and beauty. There's a recipe for the perfect free kick, instructions on how to trick gravity, an exploration of the amazingly intricate Mandelbrot set and its pretty cousins, the Julia sets, and a mathematical look at the harmonies of music. And if you're interested in the movements in your bank account, there's an article investigating what makes markets stable.
Learn about the aerodynamics of footballs and perfect your free kick.
You've probably seen pictures of the famed Mandelbrot set and its mysterious cousins, the Julia sets. In this article Robert L. Devaney explores the maths behind these beauties and shows that they're loaded with mathematical meaning.
What goes up must come down — or does it? Find out how to cheat gravity with Julian Havil.
What does a mathematician from the 3rd century BC have to do with tuning musical instruments in 17th century Europe? Benjamin Wardhaugh tells us about one of the more unusual places you might find Euclid's algorithm being used.
In the last article of this three-part series, Phil Wilson shows how simple graphs can tell you a lot about the economy — and not only in Slugworld.
How to keep up the suspense
  • The Fields Medals: Maths in the media
  • Plus new writers award: last chance to enter
  • Readers' corner: Why is nim easy and chess hard?
Travel, money, meeting new people, living in new cultures, and a whole lot of sport — that's where maths has lead Jamie Clarke, an IT project manager who specialises in international sport projects such as the recent Winter Olympics in Torino. Jamie tells Plus how he went from engineering to the Olympics.
Shifting large buildings
The hero of this book is Euler's formula: eiπ + 1 = 0 This simple equation has been widely considered through the last two centuries to be one of the most beautiful formulae of mathematics, and Nahin tells us why.
Do you love football, marvel at Beckham's perfect swerving free kicks and find formations fascinating? Or do you love science, and want to find out how aerodynamics affects a ball in flight and discover the insights statistical analysis of real-life data can give?
What makes numbers interesting? The subtitle of this beautiful book is the motivation, map, and message of its 188-page journey from zero to infinity. With concise insight, Reid takes the digits from 0 to 9 as chapter titles and starting points of voyages into the history and deep concepts of modern mathematics.