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December 8, 2015

We've read the book. We've bought the T-shirt. And now, finally, here it is: the movie of one of our favourite maths problems, the bridges of Königsberg. Though admittedly, we made it ourselves. We learnt several interesting lessons in the process. For example that a bin doesn't make a good supporting character and that people who shouldn't be in the frame should get out of it. But other than that, we're well on course for an Oscar! And we believe that the solution to this problem is a true example of mathematical creativity.


You can read more about the bridges of Königsberg here.

This video was inspired by content on our sister site Wild Maths, which encourages students to explore maths beyond the classroom and is designed to nurture mathematical creativity. The site is aimed at 7 to 16 year-olds, but open to all. It provides games, investigations, stories and spaces to explore, where discoveries are to be made. Some have starting points, some a big question and others offer you a free space to investigate.

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December 7, 2015
Gallery

T

Can you cut up an old playing card to make a hole big enough to walk through?

Have a go! If you struggle, visit Wild Maths, where you can get some ideas and also find other things to do with paper and scissors.

Enjoy!

Wild Maths encourages students to explore maths beyond the classroom and is designed to nurture mathematical creativity. The site is aimed at 7 to 16 year-olds, but open to all. It provides games, investigations, stories and spaces to explore, where discoveries are to be made. Some have starting points, some a big question and others offer you a free space to investigate.

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December 7, 2015

Sometimes a piece of mathematics can be so neat and elegant, it makes you want to shout "eureka!" even if you haven't produced it yourself. One of our favourite examples of this is the art gallery problem.

Gallery

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao: hard to supervise. Image: MykReeve.

Suppose you have an art gallery containing priceless paintings and sculptures. You would like it to be supervised by security guards, and you want to employ enough of them so that at any one time the guards can between them oversee the whole gallery. How many guards will you need?

Think about this for a while (go on, it's Sunday) and once you've had enough, read about the answer and its proof here. It's pure genius!

This article was inspired by Wild Maths, which encourages students to explore maths beyond the classroom and is designed to nurture mathematical creativity. The site is aimed at 7 to 16 year-olds, but open to all. It provides games, investigations, stories and spaces to explore, where discoveries are to be made. Some have starting points, some a big question and others offer you a free space to investigate.

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December 5, 2015

Got it! a game for two players. The first player chooses a whole number from 1 to 4. After that players take turns to add a whole number from 1 to 4 to the running total. The player who hits the target of 23 wins the game.

23

You can play the game against a friend, or against the computer using the interactivity on Wild Maths. Can you find a winning strategy? If yes, can you describe it? And what if you change the target number to something other than 23, or the numbers you are allowed to add to something other than 1 to 4?

Have fun!

Wild Maths encourages students to explore maths beyond the classroom and is designed to nurture mathematical creativity. The site is aimed at 7 to 16 year-olds, but open to all. It provides games, investigations, stories and spaces to explore, where discoveries are to be made. Some have starting points, some a big question and others offer you a free space to investigate.

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December 3, 2015

If you want to draw a rhombus on dotty paper, can you start with any two dots?

Rhombuses

Explore the question with the interactivity on the Wild Maths website, where you can also find some follow-up questions. Have fun!

Wild Maths encourages students to explore maths beyond the classroom and is designed to nurture mathematical creativity. The site is aimed at 7 to 16 year-olds, but open to all. It provides games, investigations, stories and spaces to explore, where discoveries are to be made. Some have starting points, some a big question and others offer you a free space to investigate.

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December 3, 2015

Can you fold a piece of paper in half? Of course you can, it's easy, you just match the two corners along one side. But can you fold it in thirds? You might be able to with a bit of fiddling and guessing, but what about fifths? Or sevenths? Or thirteenths? There is a simple way you can fold a piece of paper into any fraction you would like – exactly – no guessing or fiddling needed!

To find out how to do it, read Folding fractions.

This article was inspired by content on Wild Maths, which encourages students to explore maths beyond the classroom and is designed to nurture mathematical creativity. The site is aimed at 7 to 16 year-olds, but open to all. It provides games, investigations, stories and spaces to explore, where discoveries are to be made. Some have starting points, some a big question and others offer you a free space to investigate.

Return to the Plus Advent Calendar

No comments yet