Packages

A brief history of quantum field theory

Something called quantum field theory has been hugely successful in describing the fundamental forces and particles. But what exactly is it? This series of accessible articles traces the history of quantum field theory, from its inception at the beginning of the twentieth century to the tantalising questions that are still open today. It's a story of pain and triumph, hardship and success.

The 2013 Plus advent calendar

Is it cold outside? Yes! The fire warm? Yes! Snow on its way? Yes! Do we love Christmas? YES! Celebrate the countdown with the Plus advent calendar featuring our favourite bits of maths.

Now, what's behind today's door...?

Information about information

What is information and how does it shape our reality?

Researching the unknown

Science is much stranger than fiction. It suggests that our Universe may just be one of infinitely many which constantly pop in and out of existence like bubbles in a bubble bath. There may be many more dimensions that the three we can see and our Universe is riddled with black holes at whose centres time and space tear themselves apart. Intrigued? This ongoing project will bring you the latest research in physics with the help of researchers from Queen Mary University of London.

Science fiction, science fact: What is space?

Space is the stage on which physics happens. It's unaffected by what happens inside it and it would still be there if everything in it disappeared. This is how we learn to think about space at school. But the idea is as novel as it is out-dated.

Science fiction, science fact: Are there parallel universes?

Are there parallel universes? In the latest online poll of our Science fiction, science fact project you told us that you'd like an answer to this question. So we spoke to physicists Adrian Kent and David Wallace to find out more. Happy reading!

The 2012 Plus advent calendar

What's that we hear? Sleigh bells! What's that we smell? Chestnuts roasting on an open fire! What can that mean? Christmas is coming! Celebrate the countdown with the Plus advent calendar featuring our favourite mathematical moments from 2012. Now, what's behind today's door...?

Science fiction, science fact: How many dimensions are there?

How many dimensions are there? In the latest online poll of our Science fiction, science fact project you told us that you'd like an answer to this question. So we asked theoretical physicist David Berman to find out more. We also bring you a range of other Plus articles exploring the question, as well as two articles from FQXi who are our partners on this project. Happy reading!

The Isaac Newton Institute: Creating eureka moments

The Isaac Newton Institute celebrates its 20th birthday this year, having opened in July 1992. To join in the celebrations we bring you a selection of articles exploring some of the research programmes that have been held there. The Institute asked us to produce these articles in 2010 and we were honoured by being afforded this rare glimpse behind its venerable doors. And as you'll see, what started out as abstract mathematics scribbled on the back of a napkin can have major impact in the real world.

Science fiction, science fact: Does infinity exist?

Does infinity exist? In the latest online poll of our Science fiction, science fact project you told us that you'd like an answer to this question. So we went to speak to cosmologist John D. Barrow to find out more. We also bring you a range of other Plus articles on the subject of infinity, as well as an article from FQXi who are our partners on this project. Happy reading!

Teacher package: Classical mechanics

Whether it's the planets moving around the Sun or building the perfect cycling track, the key to many questions in our lives lies in classical mechanics. This teacher package brings together all our content on mechanics.

Teacher package: Rational and irrational numbers

This teacher package is devoted to the number line and the two major classes of numbers it's divided into: rational numbers, which can be written as fractions, and irrational numbers, which are everything else.

  • Want facts and want them fast? Our Maths in a minute series explores key mathematical concepts in just a few words.