particle physics

A bump in the data from the LHC promises exciting news.

What are the mysteries that still remain in particle physics?

Latest observations hint towards new particles.

It's amazing to think that our world is based on a handful of fundamental particles and forces. Find out how it all fits together.

There are many theories in particle physics that cannot be tested in experiments. Does this make it unscientific? This debate, featuring one of our favourite theoretical physicists, David Tong, explores the question.

We might have found the Higgs boson, but the search for new physics at the LHC isn't over yet.

By the 1970s physicists had successfully tamed three of the fundamental forces using a sophisticated construct called quantum field theory. The trouble was that the framework seemed to fall apart when you looked at very high or very low energy scales. So how could these be thought of as valid theories? It's a question physicists are still grappling with today.

The early 1950s were an experimental gold mine for physicists, with new particles produced in accelerators almost every week. Yet the strong nuclear force that acted between them defied theoretical description, sending physicists on a long and arduous journey that culminated in several Nobel prizes and the exotic concept of "asymptotic freedom".

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