Issue 2

May 1997

What mathematicians get up to isn't all about heavy calculations and proof. In this issue we look at some recent mathematical discoveries in the world of games and also explore a few of the ways in which mathematics has helped to solve difficult problems in large, complex communication networks.

The British General Election (May 1997) is an example of how simple mathematical ideas help in understanding information that involves numbers.
After 5,000 years, the game of Nine Men's Morris has succumbed to the power of modern computing, plus other recent mathematical discoveries in the world of games.
The mathematics underlying today's complex telephone networks is still based on his work. Erlang was the first person to study the problem of telephone networks.
Find out how modern telephone networks use mathematics to make it possible for a person to dial a friend in another country just as easily as if they were in the same street, or to read web pages that are on a computer in another continent.
Here is an experiment that you can easily do yourself to test Bernoulli's equation. There are also 2 questions and answers.

Can every even number greater than 2 can be written as the sum of two primes? It's one of the trickiest questions in maths.

  • Allergic to mathematics?
  • The inner beauty of pure mathematics
  • A journey with mathematics
  • Staff room
We talk to Tim Pilkington, a keen basketball player, who has a joint honours BSc in Maths, Physical Education and Sports Science from Loughborough University. Tim has worked as a mathematics teacher and is now working as an accountant.
Carnivorous beetles hunt down breakfast