Author: Marianne Freiberger

A new 3D version of the Mandelbrot set
The 2009 Nobel Prize in Economics goes to two unusual economists
Some preliminary results on the swine flu pandemic
And what are gravitational waves?
A new foam with medical potential
An unconventional perspective on an art show
A Gömböc is a strange thing. It looks like an egg with sharp edges, and when you put it down it starts wriggling and rolling around as if it were alive. Until quite recently, no-one knew whether Gömböcs even existed. Even now, Gábor Domokos, one of their discoverers, reckons that in some sense they barely exists at all. So what are Gömböcs and what makes them special?
How do we know how many people have got it?
A statistical test applied to the election results
With online socialising and alternative realities like Second Life it may seem as if reality has become a whole lot bigger over the last few years. In one branch of theoretical physics, though, things seem to be going the other way. String theorists have been developing the idea that the space and time we inhabit, including ourselves, might be nothing more than an illusion, a hologram conjured up by a reality which lacks a crucial feature of the world as we perceive it: the third dimension. Plus talks to Juan Maldacena to find out more.