Author: Marianne Freiberger

With this collection of letters Ian Stewart, accomplished mathematician, science writer, and even science fiction writer, accompanies a young and imaginary student on her path to becoming a professional mathematician. The letters address the questions that arise naturally at the crucial points in "Meg's" career, from leaving school and pondering whether to take a maths degree, through to becoming a fully established mathematician wondering how to juggle teaching and research.
A new mathematical model describes how plants can stop desertification
A statistical study into Iraq war deaths sparks controversy
A new piece of free educational software
The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search strikes again
The highest honour in maths has been awarded to four mathematicians
Mathematicians and artists mingle in London
Van Gogh paintings mimic the physics that governs turbulence
An unnamed girl in an unnamed, but contemporary, European city enters a rather gloomy old building, reading its address from a crumpled piece of paper. Inside, being given preference over a dozen people sitting in a waiting room, she is ushered into the office of Albert Einstein. "You said that time doesn't exist, so I took the liberty of coming to see you," she says. "You did the right thing," he replies. Thus a conversation ensues that spans all the 176 pages of this book.
Maths finds the structures that underpin written language