quantum mechanics

Are there parallel universes? Universes in which, rather than reading this article, you are still asleep; in which you are happier, unhappier, richer, poorer, or even dead? The answer is "possibly". It's a controversial claim but one that has won more and more followers over the last few decades.

Everyone knows what time is. We can practically feel it ticking away, marching on in the same direction with horrifying regularity. Time has enslaved the Western world and become our most precious commodity. Turn it over to the physicists however, and it begins to morph, twist and even crumble away. So what is time exactly?

This podcast featuring Paul Davies, a theoretical physicist and cosmologist at Arizona State University and Director of BEYOND: Centre for Fundamental Concepts in Science, explores this difficult question and accompanies our What is time article.

To mark national cat day, here's a quick look at the most famous cat in the history of science: Schrödinger's cat.

At the heart of modern physics lurks a terrible puzzle: the two main theories that describe the world we live in just won't fit together.

A closer look at one of the simplest quantum algorithms.

Quantum computers often grab the science headlines. But what exactly is quantum computing? What will quantum computers be able to do, and when can we expect to have fully functional ones?

An untapped resource could provide the magic needed for quantum computation — and perhaps even open the door to time travel.

Here's a brief introduction to the possible future of computing.

Observers are, of course, vital in physics: we test our theories by comparing them to our observations. But in cosmology, as Jim Hartle explains, we could be one of many possible observers in the Universe and knowing which one we are is vital in testing our theories.

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