biology

When insects go foraging, they zoom off from their nest in complex zig-zag paths. How do they manage to find their way back home? And how do they manage to do so along a straight path? These questions are explored in an exhibit at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, currently taking place at the Southbank Centre in London.

Genes normally evolve by tiny mutations, but every now and then something more radical occurs and entire genes along a chromosome get flipped. Understanding gene flipping boils down to solving a problem from pure maths. Colva Roney-Dougal and Vincent Vatter explain, taking us on a journey from waiters sorting pancakes, via one of the richest men in the world, to the genetic similarities of mice and humans.
Controlled chaos produces realistic behaviour in robotic cockroach
New insights into gene permutations
The European Science Foundation backs systems biology
Mathematicians lead effort to build common model of the immune system
A Beautiful Mathematical Method for Modelling Viruses
The search for the maths gene
A mathematical understanding of what makes our hearts beat could save lives.
Using mathematics to do a head count, researchers have discovered the world's biggest jaguar population in a protected area.
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