University of Cambridge

We all now know about R, but sometimes it can be good to consider another number: the growth rate of an epidemic.

Mathematical models can help the nation return to (some sort of) normality.

Mathematicians are helping to develop an AI tool to help with diagnosing COVID-19 and making prognoses for infected patients.

How far can virus-carrying droplets fly in different environments — from buses to supermarkets? Maths can provide some answers.

We explore why you need to be extremely careful when combining the reproduction ratios of a disease in different settings, such as hospitals and the community.

How do people in different countries feel about the COVID-19 pandemic and the measures taken by their governments?

How do mathematical models of COVID-19 work and should we believe them? We talk to an epidemiologist, who has been working flat out to inform the government, to find out more.

David Spiegelhalter, expert in risk and evidence communication, tells us how well the UK government has done so far communicating about Covid-19.

Spencer Becker-Kahn explains what minimal surfaces are and why he likes them.

For over 250 years minimal surfaces have been playing hide and seek with mathematicians. But what are they and why are they interesting?