mathematics and language

Can physics shed new light on understanding language? Sanjaye Ramgoolam tells us about his exciting new approach that brings together theoretical physics, mathematics and computer science.

Can physics shed new light on understanding language? An exciting new approach that brings together theoretical physics, mathematics and computer science might give us a new way to capture what makes a language unique.

Can physics shed new light on understanding language? An exciting new approach that brings together theoretical physics, mathematics and computer science might give us a new way to capture what makes a language unique.

Can physics shed new light on understanding language? An exciting new approach that brings together theoretical physics, mathematics and computer science might give us a new way to capture what makes a language unique.

Sanjaye Ramgoolam uses techniques from physics in linguistics, the study of languages. Find out more about this surprising connection between physics, maths and language in this video.

Whether you're aware of it or not, the language you use to express yourself follows strict mathematical principles.

Where does our ability to do abstract maths come from? A new study sheds some fascinating light on the question.

How to approximate the English language using maths.

People as well as animals are born with a sense for numbers. But is this inborn number sense related to mathematical ability? A new study suggests that it is.

We often think of mathematics as a language, but does our brain process mathematical structures in the same way as it processes language? A new study published in the journal Psychological Science suggests that it does: the process of storing and reusing syntax "works across cognitive domains."