The physics of observers

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Imagine if your body weight depended on the colour of your underwear. Strangely, something quite similar happens when you make measurements in quantum mechanics. Discover more about contextuality in this video interview with Jeremy Butterfield, philosopher of physics.
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Quantum mechanics suggests that observers can influence the outcomes of measurements. If that's the case, then do these observers need to be conscious? Does consciousness play a special role in physics at all?

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Modern theories suggest that the Universe really is unimaginably large — perhaps it's infinite, but even if it's not, it's so large it may as well be. But does this sheer scale affect how we reason about cosmology? In this video interview, we talk to David Wallace to find out more.

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Quantum mechanics seems to suggest that passive observation is impossible: the very act of looking at something can change what's being looked at. In this video interview, we talk to David Wallace and Adrian Kent to find out more.

Imagine your weight depended on the colour of your underwear! Something quite similar happens with measurements in quantum physics. Find out more here...

What does contextually mean for real-life measurements and what does it have to do with religious questions?

Imagine your weight depended on the colour of your underwear! Something quite similar may be happening when you are measuring things in quantum physics. Find out more here...

Pilot wave theory is an extension of quantum mechanics that doesn't exhibit any of that weird randomness or fuzziness. But that doesn't mean it's totally sane. Here is a quick introduction.

When it comes to the entire cosmos, we humans are incredibly small and insignificant. But that's precisely why we need to take ourselves into account when thinking about the Universe. Find out why.

One way of making quantum mechanics independent of observers is to accept that we live in many parallel worlds.