thermodynamics

Why does time only ever move in one direction? We talk to philosophers of physics Jeremy Butterfield and David Wallace, as well as the eminent Roger Penrose about the puzzle time poses to physicists and what it has to do with the Big Bang and the second law of thermodynamics.

Everyone knows what time is. We can practically feel it ticking away, marching on in the same direction with horrifying regularity. Time has enslaved the Western world and become our most precious commodity. Turn it over to the physicists however, and it begins to morph, twist and even crumble away. So what is time exactly?

We talk to Chiara Marletto about a new way of looking at the physical world that may solve some of the problems physicists are currently struggling with.

A new way of looking at the physical world promises to shed light on some of the problems physics as we know it can't deal with.

This article explores how constructor theory may be able to provide answers to the questions posed in the first part of the article.

We explore some problems physics as we know it has trouble dealing with and a new theory that may provide answers.

Is it about energy? Is it about disorder? Or is it about information? It's all three!

Our messy desk is proof of the second law of thermodynamics...

To create energy from information you would need to break the second law of thermodynamics — that's impossible in the real world, but could theories that do break it shed light on why nature is the way it is?