Tennis teasers

With Wimbledon building up to its grand finale, we revisit the maths of tennis, to fill those gaps between matches and the tennis vacuum that will ensure after tomorrow. Enjoy!

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Winning at Wimbledon
What does it take to win at Wimbledon? Can you figure out how many games the champion has to win? And how many matches are played overall?


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Spinning the perfect serve
A mathematical analysis of how to hit a winning serve shows that spin is the thing. Perhaps there's still time for coaches to include some maths in their players' preparations!


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Anyone for tennis (and tennis and tennis...)?
American John Isner and the Frenchman Nicolas Mahut played an epic 11-hour match in 2010. Just how freaky was their titanic fifth set and what odds might a bookmaker offer for a repeat?


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Making a racket: the science of tennis
A perfect athletic performance takes more than training, it also takes engineers working hard to produce the cutting-edge equipment. If you're a tennis player, your most important piece of equipment is your racket. Over recent decades new materials have made tennis rackets ever bigger, lighter and more powerful. So what kind of science goes into designing new rackets?


And you can also find out whether the robots have their eye on the trophy, whether tennis should be in the Olympics, and much more about maths and sport on Plus and on the MMP's Maths and sport site.