book review

"Marvellous, surprising, crystal-clear, amazing, stimulating, delightful, fascinating" — this is how our reviewer described Nonplussed!, a book published last year by by the same author.
It turns out your mum was wrong after all: you can judge a book by its cover. This book has a colourful, detailed, and tantalising cover adorned with portraits of people you may or may not know. Who are they, and what do they have to do with numbers at work, and the culture in which we live?
How do you do it? Horizontally from side to side, or perhaps criss-cross, producing a series of Xs running up your feet? Towards the end of The shoelace book, its author Burkard Polster raises a troubling question. Despite all the here-today, gone-tomorrow vagaries of fashion, and in spite of the huge variety of shoe styles available to us in this golden age of footwear, why does almost everyone lace their shoes in one of these two ways?
In their new book John Bryant and Chris Sangwin explore the complex problems and challenges facing engineers and mathematicians now and through the ages.
Ever wondered what mathematicians do all day? Finding Moonshine tells the story of a year in the life of the author, an Oxford professor known for his books, as well as radio and TV presentations of mathematics to the general public.
This review looks at two books on one of the most important, and most difficult, open problems in mathematics: the Riemann hypothesis.
This recently released DVD contains three films on fractal geometry, all directed and produced for a general audience by Nigel Lesmoir-Gordon.
The Poincaré conjecture is one of the few mathematical results that has managed to catch the interest of the mainstream media.
I will tell you all about the book, but first I want to tell you what it felt like to read it. It felt like being back at the beginning of my adventure into mathematics. It felt like the first time the history, culture, and philosophy of maths were unfolded before me.
I've read several of Paul Nahin's books before (see my review of Dr. Euler's fabulous formula in Plus) and this is no exception to his excellent style. The strategies of pursuit and evasion have fascinated mathematicians for centuries. One of the earliest problems was posed by Frenchman Pierre Bouger in 1732.
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